About

This blog takes it’s name from a short passage in a sermon that Charles Spurgeon preached at New Park Street Chapel and was published on October 15th, 1908. The sermon is entitled simply “God’s Providence” and is reproduced here, at The Spurgeon Archive. The passage in question appears near the end of the sermon and reads, in part, as follows:

You will say this morning, Our minister is a fatalist. Your minister is no such thing. Some will say, Ah! he believes in fate. He does not believe in fate at all. What is fate? Fate is this—Whatever is, must be. But there is a difference between that and Providence. Providence says, Whatever God ordains must be; but the wisdom of God never ordains any thing without a purpose. Every thing in this world is working for some one great end. Fate does not say that. Fate simply says that the thing must be; Providence says, God moves the wheels along, and there they are. If any thing would go wrong, God puts it right; and if there is any thing that would move awry, he puts his hand and alters it. It comes to the same thing; but there is a difference as to the object. There is all the difference between fate and Providence that there is between a man with good eyes and a blind man. Fate is a blind thing; it is the avalanche crushing the village down below and destroying thousands. Providence is not an avalanche; it is a rolling river, rippling at the first like a rill down the sides of the mountain, followed by minor streams, till it rolls in the broad ocean of everlasting love, working for the good of the human race. The doctrine of Providence is not, that what is, must be; but that, what is, works together for the good of our race, and especially for the good of the chosen people of God. The wheels are full of eyes; not blind wheels.

God’s providence and sovereignty are crucial concepts for Christians to understand. They are important, I think, not just as matters of abstract theology, but because they are indispensable to developing an all-encompassing Christian worldview. Given how important those concepts are, I thought it would be appropriate to refer to them in naming this blog, in which I hope to build on that foundation to write about developing a Christian worldview and related topics.

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